Posts Tagged 'tools'

DIL Mapping workshop: How to Make Maps

Please join the Image Resource Center for the first talk in our new series, Mapping, which will cover data visualization, map creation, digital recreation, as well as provide an introduction to mapping tools and resources.

Our first speaker in the series is Professor Keith Clarke from the Department of Geography at UCSB, who will present How to Make Maps.  Professor Clarke’s research focuses on Cartography and Geographic Information Science. He is the author of numerous books and articles, including Maps & Web Mapping an “introduction to the history, principles and current technologies used in mapping and cartography.” His courses include Cartographic Design and Geovisualization, Maps in Science and Society, and Maps and Spatial Reasoning. He recently gave a GRIT talk entitled “Mapping the Great Indoors,” which addresses the challenges of documenting internal (non-GPS range) space – you can view “Mapping the Great Indoors” here.

In How to Make Maps, Professor Clarke will provide an overview of map-making, followed by a real time creation of a map to demonstrate the application of open source tools. He will demonstrate resources that enable the discovery and ingest of map data, map creation, design and editing, and publishing. The goal is for attendees to be able to create their own map for a paper, publication or web site.

Time: Wednesday, October 31, 2-4:00pm

Place: The Digital Image Lab, inside Arts room 1245

Please send any inquiries to Jackie Spafford: spafford@hfa.ucsb.edu

British Library releases Leonardo da Vinci’s Codex Arundel online

Screenshot of Leonardo da Vinci, Notebook ('The Codex Arundel'), Folio 24v (left) - Studies for an underwater breathing apparatus. Folio 25r (right) - Notes on water and on astronomy of the sun and moon (courtesy British Library)Tthe British Library and Microsoft have partnered to make Leonardo da Vinci’s Notebook, known as The Codex Arundel, available online. There are two ways you can explore it:

  1. Turning the Pages: as it sounds, view the notebook by “turning” pages with your mouse, and read notes from the British Library as you go. Note: depending on your internet speed, it will take a minute or two to load. If you’d rather turn the pages of only notebook highlights, view them here. Visit Turning the Pages 2.0 for information about the technology.
  2. Browse the text: while it doesn’t have the exciting features of Turning the Pages, you can zoom in close here, exploring the handwriting or drawings (or even the binding and paper).

Click here to see all of the British Library’s virtual books.

via Archdaily

Five Cutting-Edge Innovations in Art History Tech

A demo of how the AR Mail postcards bring the Saint Sophia Cathedral of to life using augmented reality (image courtesy The Getty Iris)The Iris, the behind the scenes blog from The Getty, posted highlights from the recent SIGGRAPH Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques in Los Angeles that they found relevant to the future of museums.

They found, among the rigging demos and VR experiences, “real opportunities for advancements in programming and outreach for galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAMs).” Take a look at:

  • Open vs. Proprietary Data: Michelangelo’s David in VR
  • Arts Edutainment: Ghost Paint
  • Intuitive Architecture: AR Mail from Harbin
  • Tech-Mediated Human Interaction: Digital Playground
  • Diversity and Disruption: Latin America and Technology

Open-source platform maps artwork provenance

Screenshot of Mapping Paintings, showing the migration of Titian’s “Europa” (screenshot via mapping paintings.org)Launched by Boston University professor Jodi Cranston, Mapping Paintings is an open-source, searchable platform for compiling provenance data for individual artworks (not just paintings, despite its name), from owners to past locations to details of sales or transactions. It allows you to select artworks of interest and visualize their records across time and space, as plotted on a map.

It’s still in the early stages of development, but one particularly neat feature of Mapping Paintings is that it lets you filter through its database and overlay the paths of selected artworks on one map. So you can compare how different pieces by the same artist have traveled or where artworks currently owned by the same museum came from.

Besides contributing new individual entries to the database, users can also publish what the site deems a “project” — a custom-made map tracking the movement of any number of artworks whose images you upload and whose provenances you enter yourself. All projects are sent to an administrator for review; only those that are accepted as accurate will be added to the online library.

via Hyperallergic

Registration Open for CaVraCon 2017, June 12-13

CaVraCon 2017, June 12 + 13, UC BerkeleyRegistration is now open for the California Visual Resources Association Conference (CaVraCon). All CaVraCon events will be held June 12-13 at Wurster Hall at UC Berkeley. We welcome information professionals in archives, commercial enterprises, libraries, museums, and visual resources collections (academic, corporate, private) as well as students and interested members of the public to attend.

The program is now live on the CaVraCon conference website! The CaVraCon conference program features presentations and panel discussions on topics such as:

  • Digitization
  • Digital Preservation
  • Copyright
  • 3D/VR
  • Emerging Technologies
  • Digital Humanities
  • Digital Art History
  • Digital Exhibits
  • Digital Assets Management
  • Image Metadata

Please see the online registration form to register. Registration is $50 (or $25 for students and retirees).

Digital heritage preservation

CyArk is an international organization (actually a consortium of numerous partners) that strives to digitally record architectural and archaeological sites, using 3D scanning technology. They create 3D data sets, or ‘point clouds’, using laser scans, then join these data points into a digital mesh wire frame.  Their projects are international and wide-ranging, including ancient rock art, temples, vernacular structures and modern monuments. Their mission includes education as well as conservation, and several of their projects include in-depth documentation and teaching aids.  Have a look at their Projects page to see completed and in-development projects.

CYARK

Guggenheim Museum offers new iPad app

Guggenheim app for iPadThe Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum has released a new app for iPad, offering access to the museum’s archival publications and a new visual interface for exploring art. This is in addition to their iPhone and Android handset app that includes multi-lingual building, collection, and select exhibition guides, information on more than 1,600 works in the museum’s collection, video and audio with closed captioning, transcripts and verbal description guides for blind and low vision visitors.

The new iPad app has all these features but also introduces new features for tablets, including free access to over 100 out-of-print museum publications dating back to the 1930s, image zoom for works in the collection, a larger format for watching videos, and VoiceOver compatibility.


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