Posts Tagged 'photography'



Now available: Performance at Tate

Charles Atlas with Cecilia Bengolea and François Chaignaud, Performance as part of Charles Atlas and Collaborators, in the Tanks at the Tate Modern, 2013 (Photo © Tate)Performance at Tate: Into the Space of Art “explores the history of performance art at Tate from the 1960s to 2016. Arising from a two-year research project, this major online publication offers a new appraisal of the place of performance art and performativity in the museum through essays and case studies on individual artworks and events. It also publishes for the first time audio, films and videos, photographs, museum documents and reviews drawn from Tate’s Archive, showing the richness and depth of the gallery’s engagement with performance.”

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George Eastman House collections online

Unidentified maker, We just held the camera in front of us, dated July [19]32, gelatin silver print (Gift of Peter J. Cohen, acc. no. 2015.0123.0042; image courtesy of The George Eastman Museum)The George Eastman Museum’s vast collections are now searchable online, including over 250,000 objects from the photography, technology, and George Eastman Legacy collections. Visit often as additional records and images will be added on an ongoing basis, including the Moving Image collection of more than 28,000 titles spanning the entire history of world cinema.

via Open Culture, h/t Denise Massa

Nine Architectural Photography Tutorials to Help You Get the Right Shot

Illustrations from "Complete self-instructing library of practical photography," vol. III, p. 56, ed. by J. B. Schriever (American School of Art and Photography (Scranton, PA: American School of Art and Photography, 1909). Courtesy New York Public LibraryCapturing the perfect architectural photograph can be far more difficult than one might anticipate.

In light of this, ArchDaily compiled a list of nine architectural photography tutorials to help you get the right shot every time.
Larnach Castle, Dunedin, New Zealand. Image by Stephen Murphy

New US history photo and news archives

Lange-Photogrammar An LA Times article today highlights two archives of great interest to students of US history: Photogrammar and Chronicling America.

Photogrammar is based at Yale University, and contains 170,000 photos commissioned by the US Farm Security Administration and the Office of War Information between 1935 and 1945.  The photographs are actually housed at the Library of Congress but Photogrammar provides the access platform.  It also includes an interactive map which lets users gather photos by region or date, and a Visualizations section which presents experiments in photo data.  The photos, including 3,244 by Dorothea Lange, are mostly public domain, and all can be downloaded.

Chronicling America is a searchable database of US newspaper pages from 1836 to 1922.  Jointly sponsored by the Library of Congress and the NEH, it contains over 10 million newspaper pages. Pages can be downloaded as JPGs or PDFs, and details can be excerpted.

Countering ISIS monument destruction with Million Image Database Project

emple of Baalshamin. Image © Bernard Gagnon via WikipediaIn a “digital race against IS,” The Institute for Digital Archaeology (IDA) is working with UNESCO World Heritage and NYU’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World to launch a Million Image Database Project. The hope is to capture one million 3D images of at-risk objects by the end of 2016 by deploying up to 5,000 heavily-modified inexpensive consumer 3D cameras that will permit inexperienced users to capture archival-quality scans and upload these images automatically to database servers. Once there, they can be used for study or, if required, 3D replication via open source technology and software.

via ArchDaily

Amazing photos of a starling “murmuration”

la-fg-flock-of-starlings-fly-murmuration-20150-008 If you’ve never seen a murmuration of starlings (and probably few of us have) these photos in the LA Times will make you gasp.  A murmuration is the mass movement of an entire flock.  The photos are like a series of very temporary sculptures.

Undeveloped film from WWII and the Rescued Film Project

RescuedFilm Photographer Levi Bettweiser specializes in recovering, developing and printing “found film.”  Last year at an Ohio auction he came across 31 rolls of undeveloped film taken by an unnamed American soldier in WWII. He painstakingly processed as many as he could (some were water damaged) and the results are wonderful documentation of one soldier’s experience. There’s more background here, and this video about the project is fascinating.

You can read more about the Rescued Film Project here.


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