Posts Tagged 'open content'

Getty Provenance Index® Databases adds art sales records

Left: The Entombment, Peter Paul Rubens, ca. 1612, oil on canvas. The J. Paul Getty Museum; right: Inventory number on The Entombment (detail). Digital images courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.

The Getty Provenance Index® has added 138,000 database records of art sales from the 1600s and 1700s, including the earliest known catalog published in Britain. This brings the cumulative Databases holdings to more than 1.7 million records taken from source material such as archival inventories, auction catalogs, and dealer stock books. Quantity and scope of available research material varies by region, period, and type of document, and records are continually expanded and enriched on a regular basis. Visit Search the Getty Provenance Index® Databases for more information.

Library of Congress digitizes rare books from the Rosenwald Collection

Giovanni Battista Braccelli, Bizzarie di varie figure / di Giouanbatista Braccelli, pittore fiorentin. [Livorno : s.n.], 1624. (courtesy Library of Congress. Lessing J. Rosenwald collection, 1345)The Rare Book and Special Collections Division of the Library of Congress has an active digitization program, sharing thousands of its treasures online for users all over the world. Their most recent announcement highlights digital additions to the Lessing J. Rosenwald Collection.

The Rosenwald Collection’s greatest strengths are in the fifteenth century woodcut books, early sixteenth-century illustrated books, William Blake, and twentieth-century livres des peintres. The late Mr. Rosenwald sought books produced by the earliest printers and outstanding presses of later periods, and books on the following subjects: science, calligraphy, botany, and chess. The catalog describing the collection published in 1978 contains 2,653 entries, many for books represented by more than one copy. The online list of items are organized by category and Rosenwald catalog number.

Click here to learn more about the Rosenwald Collection.

The Met implements an image Open Access policy

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, The Harvesters, 1565 (Acc. No. 19.164; courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art took to Facebook Live today to announce their new Open Access policy, which makes images of artworks it believes to be in the public domain widely and freely available for unrestricted use, and at no cost, in accordance with the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) designation and the Terms and Conditions of this website.

It also makes available data from the entire online collection ― both works it believes to be in the public domain and those under copyright or other restrictions ― including basic information such as title, artist, date, medium, and dimensions. This data is available to all in accordance with the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) designation.

Nationalmuseum releases hi-res images on Wikimedia Commons

Vincent van Gogh, Acacia in Flowers (Stokholm, Nationalmuseum, #NM 5939)This month, Sweden’s Nationalmuseum contributed over 3100 high quality digital images of works from their collection into Wikimedia Commons. While the museum’s long-term goal is greater visibility and accessibility to their collection, in the short term it also provides access to artworks not currently on view, since the museum is undergoing renovation and most of the gallery spaces are closed to the public.

The images – all of paintings in the public domain – can be downloaded in various sizes, including a JPEG for presentations or an archival quality TIFF for research. Object and digital image credit line information are also offered with each work of art.

via Artdaily

NYARC Discovery: Web archives and photoarchive images at your fingertips

Displaying virtual browse feature of NYARC Discovery

NYARC Discovery is a new research tool from the libraries of the Brooklyn Museum, the Frick Collection, and The Museum of Modern Art. With a single search, you can find web archives along with books, journal articles, auction catalogs, traditional archives and a host of other materials, including nearly 200,000 catalog records and over 75,000 digital images from the Frick Art Reference Library’s Photoarchive.

If you would like to nominate a website for consideration for inclusion in one of these collections, please submit the online nominations form.

h/t Kerry Sullivan

Met’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The New Edition

Fragment of a Queen's Face, New Kingdom, Amarna Period, yellow jasper (image: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Edward S. Harkness Gift, 1926, Acc. No. 26.7.1396)The Metropolitan Museum of Art has launched an updated Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The New Edition with a new navigation and interface, updated images, and restructured editorial content. The Timeline is still relational but now with a seamless browsing experience and easily accessible on any device, anywhere.

The Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History presents a chronological, geographical, and thematic exploration of global art history through The Met collection. It is a reference, research, and teaching tool conceived for students and scholars of art history. Authored by The Met’s experts, the Timeline comprises 300 chronologies, close to 1000 essays, and over 7000 works of art. It is regularly updated and enriched to provide new scholarship and insights on the collection.

h/t Jasmine Burns

Yale Center for British Art adds 1000s of new hi-res images

George Hicks, The Sinews of Old England, 1857, watercolor, graphite, gouache, gum arabic, and scraping out on cream wove paper, Yale Center for British Art, Friends of British Art FundThe Yale Center for British Art has just released more than 22,000 additional high-resolution images through its online collection. To date, the Center has made more than 69,000 images freely available online. This most recent release was made in conjunction with Public Domain Day, and while most of the artworks themselves are not new entries to the public domain, in most cases this will be the first time that digital images of these works are easily and openly accessible to the world. The Center’s images are available as both display-sized jpegs and full-page tiffs and are compatible with the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF), a project to make the world’s image repositories interoperable and accessible.

via Artdaily


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