Posts Tagged 'open content'

British Library releases Leonardo da Vinci’s Codex Arundel online

Screenshot of Leonardo da Vinci, Notebook ('The Codex Arundel'), Folio 24v (left) - Studies for an underwater breathing apparatus. Folio 25r (right) - Notes on water and on astronomy of the sun and moon (courtesy British Library)Tthe British Library and Microsoft have partnered to make Leonardo da Vinci’s Notebook, known as The Codex Arundel, available online. There are two ways you can explore it:

  1. Turning the Pages: as it sounds, view the notebook by “turning” pages with your mouse, and read notes from the British Library as you go. Note: depending on your internet speed, it will take a minute or two to load. If you’d rather turn the pages of only notebook highlights, view them here. Visit Turning the Pages 2.0 for information about the technology.
  2. Browse the text: while it doesn’t have the exciting features of Turning the Pages, you can zoom in close here, exploring the handwriting or drawings (or even the binding and paper).

Click here to see all of the British Library’s virtual books.

via Archdaily

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John Margolies Roadside America Photograph Archive

Wigwam Village Motel, Rialto, California, image date 1977 (John Margolies Roadside America photograph archive (1972-2008), Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division)

The Library of Congress has digitized over 11,000 slides by architectural critic and curator John Margolies (1940-2016). Photographed over a span of forty years (1969-2008), Margolies’ Roadside America work chronicled a period of American history defined by the automobile and the ease of travel it allowed. The Archive is one of the most comprehensive documentary studies of vernacular commercial structures along main streets, byways, and highways throughout the United States in the twentieth century.

Picturing Places from the British Museum

William Darton, A new pocket plan of London, Westminster and Southwark: with all the adjacent buildings. Also a correct lift of upwards of 300 hackney coach fares. (London, 1797) [Shelfmark: Maps Crace Port. 5.181]Picturing Places explores the role and history of topographical views, maps and texts through over 500 examples from the British Library’s collections and beyond, with fresh research in over 100 articles and films from an academic conference hosted by the British Library and Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

The site highlights a selection of important items from the Library’s vast and varied collections, including prints, drawings, paintings, books, maps, letters, notes and ephemera. Users can examine high-resolution digitized images and read articles by emerging and established scholars discussing the history, context and significance of these images.

Open-source platform maps artwork provenance

Screenshot of Mapping Paintings, showing the migration of Titian’s “Europa” (screenshot via mapping paintings.org)Launched by Boston University professor Jodi Cranston, Mapping Paintings is an open-source, searchable platform for compiling provenance data for individual artworks (not just paintings, despite its name), from owners to past locations to details of sales or transactions. It allows you to select artworks of interest and visualize their records across time and space, as plotted on a map.

It’s still in the early stages of development, but one particularly neat feature of Mapping Paintings is that it lets you filter through its database and overlay the paths of selected artworks on one map. So you can compare how different pieces by the same artist have traveled or where artworks currently owned by the same museum came from.

Besides contributing new individual entries to the database, users can also publish what the site deems a “project” — a custom-made map tracking the movement of any number of artworks whose images you upload and whose provenances you enter yourself. All projects are sent to an administrator for review; only those that are accepted as accurate will be added to the online library.

via Hyperallergic

Guggenheim offers publications as e-books

Cover of Second enlarged catalogue of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Collection of Non-objective Paintings : on exhibition from February 8, 1937 through February 28, 1937, compiled by Hilla Rebay von Ehrenwiesen (New York: The Bradford Press, Inc., 1937)Over five years ago we celebrated the Guggenheim’s first exhibition catalogue e-book.

Currently, the museum has over 200 selected publications freely available on Internet Archive. The Archive offers many different view and download options for the books, which were published between 1937 – 2006. The project is part of the museum’s commitment as an educational institution to document its exhibitions and collections.

h/t Christian Brown

 

 

Getty Provenance Index® Databases adds art sales records

Left: The Entombment, Peter Paul Rubens, ca. 1612, oil on canvas. The J. Paul Getty Museum; Right: Inventory number on The Entombment (detail). Digital images courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.

The Getty Provenance Index® has added 138,000 database records of art sales from the 1600s and 1700s, including the earliest known catalog published in Britain. This brings the cumulative Databases holdings to more than 1.7 million records taken from source material such as archival inventories, auction catalogs, and dealer stock books. Quantity and scope of available research material varies by region, period, and type of document, and records are continually expanded and enriched on a regular basis. Visit Search the Getty Provenance Index® Databases for more information.

Library of Congress digitizes rare books from the Rosenwald Collection

Giovanni Battista Braccelli, Bizzarie di varie figure / di Giouanbatista Braccelli, pittore fiorentin. [Livorno : s.n.], 1624. (courtesy Library of Congress. Lessing J. Rosenwald collection, 1345)The Rare Book and Special Collections Division of the Library of Congress has an active digitization program, sharing thousands of its treasures online for users all over the world. Their most recent announcement highlights digital additions to the Lessing J. Rosenwald Collection.

The Rosenwald Collection’s greatest strengths are in the fifteenth century woodcut books, early sixteenth-century illustrated books, William Blake, and twentieth-century livres des peintres. The late Mr. Rosenwald sought books produced by the earliest printers and outstanding presses of later periods, and books on the following subjects: science, calligraphy, botany, and chess. The catalog describing the collection published in 1978 contains 2,653 entries, many for books represented by more than one copy. The online list of items are organized by category and Rosenwald catalog number.

Click here to learn more about the Rosenwald Collection.


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