Posts Tagged 'museums'

Bard Graduate Center exhibition installation images now in Artstor

Thomas Hope: Regency Designer, Installation view; 2008. Image and original data contributed by Bard Graduate Center GalleryArtstor announced that the Bard Graduate Center has released 2,500 images of exhibitions installed in their Gallery. The Bard Graduate Center is an academic unit of Bard College that offers advanced degrees in decorative arts, design history, and material culture and the Gallery is an intimate environment for viewing loan exhibitions curated by the Center’s faculty, staff, students, or specialized curatorial consultants, frequently in collaboration with renowned institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Victoria and Albert Museum, and the New-York Historical Society.

Slow Art Day: Saturday, April 8, 2017

Slow Art Day 2017 (Photo by Greg Neville)Slow Art Day, a global event to stop and savor works of art, will take place on Saturday, April 8. This is how it works:

  1. Sign up at a participating museum or art gallery. Locally, you can join in at the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB) and the Hammer Museum, UCLA.
  2. Attend and look at works of art slowly. Some museums pick 5 works, others may concentrate on 1 or 2 – while yet others will give more options. Show up at your venue, pay the admission fee (if there is one) and then look slowly – 5-10 minutes – at each piece of pre-assigned art or exhibition.
  3. Discuss your experience with venue hosts and other participants

Rijksstudio award finalists

For the last three years the Rijksmuseum has solicited design contributions inspired by the museum collection.  Members of the public can download images and submit their creations, which you can now vote on (until April 20).   Visit the Rijksstudio site to see the 10 wonderful finalists, and cast your vote.

Getty Provenance Index® Databases adds art sales records

Left: The Entombment, Peter Paul Rubens, ca. 1612, oil on canvas. The J. Paul Getty Museum; Right: Inventory number on The Entombment (detail). Digital images courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.

The Getty Provenance Index® has added 138,000 database records of art sales from the 1600s and 1700s, including the earliest known catalog published in Britain. This brings the cumulative Databases holdings to more than 1.7 million records taken from source material such as archival inventories, auction catalogs, and dealer stock books. Quantity and scope of available research material varies by region, period, and type of document, and records are continually expanded and enriched on a regular basis. Visit Search the Getty Provenance Index® Databases for more information.

Getty’s first online exhibition preserves Palmyra

Two-part panorama featuring Colonnade Street, Louis Vignes, 1864. Albumen print. 8.8 x 11.4 in. (22.5 x 29 cm), each print. The Getty Research Institute, 2015.R.15 (digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program)

The Getty Research Institute‘s inaugural digital exhibition, The Legacy of Ancient Palmyra, was developed “as a tribute to Palmyra” with images by traveling artists and explorers who documented the site in former states of preservation. “Their works contribute to Palmyra’s legacy, one that goes far beyond the stones of its once great buildings.”

There are numerous additional resources to explore, including a Facebook Live behind-the-scenes perspective event with The Legacy of Ancient Palmyra co-curator Peter Louis Bonfitto and web designers Masato Nakada and Karen To Nakada as they discuss the challenges and insights that came with the creation of the GRI’s first online exhibition on Tuesday, March 14, from 9:00-9:15 am.

The Davis Museum’s statement on the immigration ban

In a comment on the current White House administration’s policies on immigration, the Davis Museum at Wellesley College has removed or covered all art in the galleries that was created by immigrants. The initiative is called Art-Less and is meant to illustrate the creative contributions made by immigrants to the US. Labels describing each piece will be left on display to underscore the impact. It runs Feb 16-21.  [Press release] davis-museum

The Met implements an image Open Access policy

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, The Harvesters, 1565 (Acc. No. 19.164; courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art took to Facebook Live today to announce their new Open Access policy, which makes images of artworks it believes to be in the public domain widely and freely available for unrestricted use, and at no cost, in accordance with the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) designation and the Terms and Conditions of this website.

It also makes available data from the entire online collection ― both works it believes to be in the public domain and those under copyright or other restrictions ― including basic information such as title, artist, date, medium, and dimensions. This data is available to all in accordance with the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) designation.


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