Posts Tagged 'museums'

Registration Open for CaVraCon 2017, June 12-13

CaVraCon 2017, June 12 + 13, UC BerkeleyRegistration is now open for the California Visual Resources Association Conference (CaVraCon). All CaVraCon events will be held June 12-13 at Wurster Hall at UC Berkeley. We welcome information professionals in archives, commercial enterprises, libraries, museums, and visual resources collections (academic, corporate, private) as well as students and interested members of the public to attend.

The program is now live on the CaVraCon conference website! The CaVraCon conference program features presentations and panel discussions on topics such as:

  • Digitization
  • Digital Preservation
  • Copyright
  • 3D/VR
  • Emerging Technologies
  • Digital Humanities
  • Digital Art History
  • Digital Exhibits
  • Digital Assets Management
  • Image Metadata

Please see the online registration form to register. Registration is $50 (or $25 for students and retirees).

Guggenheim offers publications as e-books

Cover of Second enlarged catalogue of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Collection of Non-objective Paintings : on exhibition from February 8, 1937 through February 28, 1937, compiled by Hilla Rebay von Ehrenwiesen (New York: The Bradford Press, Inc., 1937)Over five years ago we celebrated the Guggenheim’s first exhibition catalogue e-book.

Currently, the museum has over 200 selected publications freely available on Internet Archive. The Archive offers many different view and download options for the books, which were published between 1937 – 2006. The project is part of the museum’s commitment as an educational institution to document its exhibitions and collections.

h/t Christian Brown

 

 

An in-depth way to explore the Garden of Earthly Delights

It’s been available for awhile, but we recently discovered this amazing interactive tool and wanted to promote it.  The Prado Museum developed an “audio-visual journey” of Heironymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights, which can be explored through a variety of means.  You can watch the full documentary, take a tour, or explore on your own by clicking the note icons at various points in the painting.  It’s a stellar example of inventive and rich museum education.

Bard Graduate Center exhibition installation images now in Artstor

Thomas Hope: Regency Designer, Installation view; 2008. Image and original data contributed by Bard Graduate Center GalleryArtstor announced that the Bard Graduate Center has released 2,500 images of exhibitions installed in their Gallery. The Bard Graduate Center is an academic unit of Bard College that offers advanced degrees in decorative arts, design history, and material culture and the Gallery is an intimate environment for viewing loan exhibitions curated by the Center’s faculty, staff, students, or specialized curatorial consultants, frequently in collaboration with renowned institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Victoria and Albert Museum, and the New-York Historical Society.

Slow Art Day: Saturday, April 8, 2017

Slow Art Day 2017 (Photo by Greg Neville)Slow Art Day, a global event to stop and savor works of art, will take place on Saturday, April 8. This is how it works:

  1. Sign up at a participating museum or art gallery. Locally, you can join in at the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB) and the Hammer Museum, UCLA.
  2. Attend and look at works of art slowly. Some museums pick 5 works, others may concentrate on 1 or 2 – while yet others will give more options. Show up at your venue, pay the admission fee (if there is one) and then look slowly – 5-10 minutes – at each piece of pre-assigned art or exhibition.
  3. Discuss your experience with venue hosts and other participants

Rijksstudio award finalists

For the last three years the Rijksmuseum has solicited design contributions inspired by the museum collection.  Members of the public can download images and submit their creations, which you can now vote on (until April 20).   Visit the Rijksstudio site to see the 10 wonderful finalists, and cast your vote.

Getty Provenance Index® Databases adds art sales records

Left: The Entombment, Peter Paul Rubens, ca. 1612, oil on canvas. The J. Paul Getty Museum; Right: Inventory number on The Entombment (detail). Digital images courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.

The Getty Provenance Index® has added 138,000 database records of art sales from the 1600s and 1700s, including the earliest known catalog published in Britain. This brings the cumulative Databases holdings to more than 1.7 million records taken from source material such as archival inventories, auction catalogs, and dealer stock books. Quantity and scope of available research material varies by region, period, and type of document, and records are continually expanded and enriched on a regular basis. Visit Search the Getty Provenance Index® Databases for more information.


Posts by Category

Posts by month

Visitors

  • 95,956

Copyright Notice

© The Red Dot, 2009. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to The Red Dot with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Pages

May 2017
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031