Posts Tagged 'libraries'

Picturing Places from the British Museum

William Darton, A new pocket plan of London, Westminster and Southwark: with all the adjacent buildings. Also a correct lift of upwards of 300 hackney coach fares. (London, 1797) [Shelfmark: Maps Crace Port. 5.181]Picturing Places explores the role and history of topographical views, maps and texts through over 500 examples from the British Library’s collections and beyond, with fresh research in over 100 articles and films from an academic conference hosted by the British Library and Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

The site highlights a selection of important items from the Library’s vast and varied collections, including prints, drawings, paintings, books, maps, letters, notes and ephemera. Users can examine high-resolution digitized images and read articles by emerging and established scholars discussing the history, context and significance of these images.

Open-source platform maps artwork provenance

Screenshot of Mapping Paintings, showing the migration of Titian’s “Europa” (screenshot via mapping paintings.org)Launched by Boston University professor Jodi Cranston, Mapping Paintings is an open-source, searchable platform for compiling provenance data for individual artworks (not just paintings, despite its name), from owners to past locations to details of sales or transactions. It allows you to select artworks of interest and visualize their records across time and space, as plotted on a map.

It’s still in the early stages of development, but one particularly neat feature of Mapping Paintings is that it lets you filter through its database and overlay the paths of selected artworks on one map. So you can compare how different pieces by the same artist have traveled or where artworks currently owned by the same museum came from.

Besides contributing new individual entries to the database, users can also publish what the site deems a “project” — a custom-made map tracking the movement of any number of artworks whose images you upload and whose provenances you enter yourself. All projects are sent to an administrator for review; only those that are accepted as accurate will be added to the online library.

via Hyperallergic

Registration Open for CaVraCon 2017, June 12-13

CaVraCon 2017, June 12 + 13, UC BerkeleyRegistration is now open for the California Visual Resources Association Conference (CaVraCon). All CaVraCon events will be held June 12-13 at Wurster Hall at UC Berkeley. We welcome information professionals in archives, commercial enterprises, libraries, museums, and visual resources collections (academic, corporate, private) as well as students and interested members of the public to attend.

The program is now live on the CaVraCon conference website! The CaVraCon conference program features presentations and panel discussions on topics such as:

  • Digitization
  • Digital Preservation
  • Copyright
  • 3D/VR
  • Emerging Technologies
  • Digital Humanities
  • Digital Art History
  • Digital Exhibits
  • Digital Assets Management
  • Image Metadata

Please see the online registration form to register. Registration is $50 (or $25 for students and retirees).

Pharos: The International Consortium of Photo Archives

Images from the Collections Jacque Doucet, Bibliothèque de l’INHA (Institut national d’histoire de l’art)

PHAROS is an international consortium of fourteen European and North American art historical photo archives committed to creating a digital platform, currently in beta, that allows research among the photographic holdings of all consortium members – an estimated 31 million images, including artworks and supplemental material.

One of the best searching features they’re working on is reverse-image searching – the ability to upload a digital image or URL where an image is located, and search the database as you would a text query to return results related to the image. This image-recognition technology strives to eradicate language barriers inherent in text searching.

via NYTimes; h/t Ann Jensen Adams

Library of Congress digitizes rare books from the Rosenwald Collection

Giovanni Battista Braccelli, Bizzarie di varie figure / di Giouanbatista Braccelli, pittore fiorentin. [Livorno : s.n.], 1624. (courtesy Library of Congress. Lessing J. Rosenwald collection, 1345)The Rare Book and Special Collections Division of the Library of Congress has an active digitization program, sharing thousands of its treasures online for users all over the world. Their most recent announcement highlights digital additions to the Lessing J. Rosenwald Collection.

The Rosenwald Collection’s greatest strengths are in the fifteenth century woodcut books, early sixteenth-century illustrated books, William Blake, and twentieth-century livres des peintres. The late Mr. Rosenwald sought books produced by the earliest printers and outstanding presses of later periods, and books on the following subjects: science, calligraphy, botany, and chess. The catalog describing the collection published in 1978 contains 2,653 entries, many for books represented by more than one copy. The online list of items are organized by category and Rosenwald catalog number.

Click here to learn more about the Rosenwald Collection.

NYARC Discovery: Web archives and photoarchive images at your fingertips

Displaying virtual browse feature of NYARC Discovery

NYARC Discovery is a new research tool from the libraries of the Brooklyn Museum, the Frick Collection, and The Museum of Modern Art. With a single search, you can find web archives along with books, journal articles, auction catalogs, traditional archives and a host of other materials, including nearly 200,000 catalog records and over 75,000 digital images from the Frick Art Reference Library’s Photoarchive.

If you would like to nominate a website for consideration for inclusion in one of these collections, please submit the online nominations form.

h/t Kerry Sullivan

Digital Public Library of America: A wealth of info, no card required

Digital Public Library of AmericaThe Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is an all-digital library that aggregates metadata — or information describing an item — and thumbnails for millions (over 11,000,000 and growing!) of photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more from libraries, archives, and museums around the United States. DPLA brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available. Search the Library, or use the Map or Timeline to focus your search by file format, contributors, date, language, location, or subject.

Want even broader search capability? Check out these apps Culture Collage (to return a DPLA search as an image stream) and, a Red Dot favorite, Search DPLA and Europeana (a side-by-side search of Europeana and the DPLA – that’s access to roughly 60 million items with one search!)


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