Posts Tagged 'libraries'

British Library releases Leonardo da Vinci’s Codex Arundel online

Screenshot of Leonardo da Vinci, Notebook ('The Codex Arundel'), Folio 24v (left) - Studies for an underwater breathing apparatus. Folio 25r (right) - Notes on water and on astronomy of the sun and moon (courtesy British Library)Tthe British Library and Microsoft have partnered to make Leonardo da Vinci’s Notebook, known as The Codex Arundel, available online. There are two ways you can explore it:

  1. Turning the Pages: as it sounds, view the notebook by “turning” pages with your mouse, and read notes from the British Library as you go. Note: depending on your internet speed, it will take a minute or two to load. If you’d rather turn the pages of only notebook highlights, view them here. Visit Turning the Pages 2.0 for information about the technology.
  2. Browse the text: while it doesn’t have the exciting features of Turning the Pages, you can zoom in close here, exploring the handwriting or drawings (or even the binding and paper).

Click here to see all of the British Library’s virtual books.

via Archdaily

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John Margolies Roadside America Photograph Archive

Wigwam Village Motel, Rialto, California, image date 1977 (John Margolies Roadside America photograph archive (1972-2008), Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division)

The Library of Congress has digitized over 11,000 slides by architectural critic and curator John Margolies (1940-2016). Photographed over a span of forty years (1969-2008), Margolies’ Roadside America work chronicled a period of American history defined by the automobile and the ease of travel it allowed. The Archive is one of the most comprehensive documentary studies of vernacular commercial structures along main streets, byways, and highways throughout the United States in the twentieth century.

Update on UCSB access to Kanopy film streaming service

KanopyBecause of the overwhelming popularity of the film streaming service Kanopy but a limited budget for film licenses, the UCSB Library is changing the way the UCSB community will be able to use the service.

Now films will be available for unlimited UCSB viewing only until the film’s fixed license expiration date, which can be found via the UCSB Library Search: search for “kanopy” and then select the Audio Visual material type on the right to find nearly 300 Kanopy videos. A film’s license can be found by clicking on its title.

If you find a video on Kanopy that you’d like to use for teaching but is not in the Library’s collections, contact Chizu Morihara. For general information on the Library’s video collections and Instructional Development’s video services, see Films & Videos at UCSB.

Library of Congress Archive adds born-digital content

Information Superhighway: Welcome to the Internet / Enjoy the Ride (via http://www.web-wise-wizard.com/internet-dns-web/)The Library of Congress has added two new born-digital collections to their archives.

The Webcomics Web Archive focuses on comics created specifically for the web and supplements the Library’s extensive holdings in comic books, graphic novels and original comic art. It has award-winning comics as well as webcomics that are significant for their longevity, reputation or subject matter. Also included are works by artists and subjects not traditionally represented in mainstream comics, including women artists and characters, artists and characters of color, LGBTQ+ artists and characters, as well as subjects such as politics, health and autobiography.

The Web Cultures Web Archive is a representative sampling of websites documenting the creation and sharing of emergent cultural traditions on the web such as GIFs, memes and emoji. As part of the American Folklife Center, the archive documents traditional cultural forms and practices, and the proliferation of smart phones, tablets, and wireless Internet connections has positioned networked communication as a space where people increasingly develop and share folklore.

Picturing Places from the British Museum

William Darton, A new pocket plan of London, Westminster and Southwark: with all the adjacent buildings. Also a correct lift of upwards of 300 hackney coach fares. (London, 1797) [Shelfmark: Maps Crace Port. 5.181]Picturing Places explores the role and history of topographical views, maps and texts through over 500 examples from the British Library’s collections and beyond, with fresh research in over 100 articles and films from an academic conference hosted by the British Library and Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

The site highlights a selection of important items from the Library’s vast and varied collections, including prints, drawings, paintings, books, maps, letters, notes and ephemera. Users can examine high-resolution digitized images and read articles by emerging and established scholars discussing the history, context and significance of these images.

Open-source platform maps artwork provenance

Screenshot of Mapping Paintings, showing the migration of Titian’s “Europa” (screenshot via mapping paintings.org)Launched by Boston University professor Jodi Cranston, Mapping Paintings is an open-source, searchable platform for compiling provenance data for individual artworks (not just paintings, despite its name), from owners to past locations to details of sales or transactions. It allows you to select artworks of interest and visualize their records across time and space, as plotted on a map.

It’s still in the early stages of development, but one particularly neat feature of Mapping Paintings is that it lets you filter through its database and overlay the paths of selected artworks on one map. So you can compare how different pieces by the same artist have traveled or where artworks currently owned by the same museum came from.

Besides contributing new individual entries to the database, users can also publish what the site deems a “project” — a custom-made map tracking the movement of any number of artworks whose images you upload and whose provenances you enter yourself. All projects are sent to an administrator for review; only those that are accepted as accurate will be added to the online library.

via Hyperallergic

Registration Open for CaVraCon 2017, June 12-13

CaVraCon 2017, June 12 + 13, UC BerkeleyRegistration is now open for the California Visual Resources Association Conference (CaVraCon). All CaVraCon events will be held June 12-13 at Wurster Hall at UC Berkeley. We welcome information professionals in archives, commercial enterprises, libraries, museums, and visual resources collections (academic, corporate, private) as well as students and interested members of the public to attend.

The program is now live on the CaVraCon conference website! The CaVraCon conference program features presentations and panel discussions on topics such as:

  • Digitization
  • Digital Preservation
  • Copyright
  • 3D/VR
  • Emerging Technologies
  • Digital Humanities
  • Digital Art History
  • Digital Exhibits
  • Digital Assets Management
  • Image Metadata

Please see the online registration form to register. Registration is $50 (or $25 for students and retirees).


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