Posts Tagged 'libraries'

Pharos: The International Consortium of Photo Archives

Images from the Collections Jacque Doucet, Bibliothèque de l’INHA (Institut national d’histoire de l’art)

PHAROS is an international consortium of fourteen European and North American art historical photo archives committed to creating a digital platform, currently in beta, that allows research among the photographic holdings of all consortium members – an estimated 31 million images, including artworks and supplemental material.

One of the best searching features they’re working on is reverse-image searching – the ability to upload a digital image or URL where an image is located, and search the database as you would a text query to return results related to the image. This image-recognition technology strives to eradicate language barriers inherent in text searching.

via NYTimes; h/t Ann Jensen Adams

Library of Congress digitizes rare books from the Rosenwald Collection

Giovanni Battista Braccelli, Bizzarie di varie figure / di Giouanbatista Braccelli, pittore fiorentin. [Livorno : s.n.], 1624. (courtesy Library of Congress. Lessing J. Rosenwald collection, 1345)The Rare Book and Special Collections Division of the Library of Congress has an active digitization program, sharing thousands of its treasures online for users all over the world. Their most recent announcement highlights digital additions to the Lessing J. Rosenwald Collection.

The Rosenwald Collection’s greatest strengths are in the fifteenth century woodcut books, early sixteenth-century illustrated books, William Blake, and twentieth-century livres des peintres. The late Mr. Rosenwald sought books produced by the earliest printers and outstanding presses of later periods, and books on the following subjects: science, calligraphy, botany, and chess. The catalog describing the collection published in 1978 contains 2,653 entries, many for books represented by more than one copy. The online list of items are organized by category and Rosenwald catalog number.

Click here to learn more about the Rosenwald Collection.

NYARC Discovery: Web archives and photoarchive images at your fingertips

Displaying virtual browse feature of NYARC Discovery

NYARC Discovery is a new research tool from the libraries of the Brooklyn Museum, the Frick Collection, and The Museum of Modern Art. With a single search, you can find web archives along with books, journal articles, auction catalogs, traditional archives and a host of other materials, including nearly 200,000 catalog records and over 75,000 digital images from the Frick Art Reference Library’s Photoarchive.

If you would like to nominate a website for consideration for inclusion in one of these collections, please submit the online nominations form.

h/t Kerry Sullivan

Digital Public Library of America: A wealth of info, no card required

Digital Public Library of AmericaThe Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is an all-digital library that aggregates metadata — or information describing an item — and thumbnails for millions (over 11,000,000 and growing!) of photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more from libraries, archives, and museums around the United States. DPLA brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available. Search the Library, or use the Map or Timeline to focus your search by file format, contributors, date, language, location, or subject.

Want even broader search capability? Check out these apps Culture Collage (to return a DPLA search as an image stream) and, a Red Dot favorite, Search DPLA and Europeana (a side-by-side search of Europeana and the DPLA – that’s access to roughly 60 million items with one search!)

NY Public Library offers 180,000 public domain images

Image courtesy NYPL.orgThe New York Public Library announced it now offers 180,000 images in their NYPL Digital Collections of library materials in the public domain. These images can be downloaded in the highest resolution available and “everyone has the freedom to enjoy and reuse these materials in almost limitless ways.” In fact, it’s encouraged.

via ARTnews

Open Access Week at Davidson Library

Open Access logoOpen Access Week is an annual international event that promotes open access as a new norm in research and scholarship. Please join us for any or all of the Library’s Open Access Week programs to learn about trends and challenges in scholarly publishing.

Programs held during the week include:

  • Reinventing Scholarly Publishing: UC Press. Monday, October 19, 4-5:15 pm (Room 1575, 1st Floor)
  • Reinventing Scientific Publishing: Collabra, JoVE, PLOS. Tuesday, October 20, 4-5:15 pm (Room 1575, 1st Floor)
  • Reinventing Impact Factors: Altmetrics. Wednesday, October 21, 4-5pm (Room 1575, 1st Floor)
  • Reinventing Publication Management at UC. Thursday, October 22, 4-6 pm (Room 1575, 1st Floor)
  • Innovation, Copyright, and the Academy: The Reinvention of Your Scholarship. Monday, November 2, 4-5:15 pm (Mary Cheadle Room, 3rd Floor)

Admission is free to all events. Refreshments will be served. The Library appreciates the support of our program co-sponsors: Academic Senate, Office of Research, and Graduate Division.

Ransom Center makes more than 22,000 images available

The Egpytian Hall, Piccadilly, detail from a letter from Albert Richard Smith to Mr. Kepper introducing John Deane. Letter mentions Dickens and Thackeray (courtesy Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin; #MSS_ThackerayWM_3_15_005)The Harry Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, has adopted an open access policy, removing the requirement for permission and use fees for a significant portion of its online collections believed to be in the public domain. In conjunction with the release of the policy, the Ransom Center launches Project REVEAL (Read and View English and American Literature), a year-long initiative to digitize and make available 25 of its manuscript collections of some of the best-known names from American and British literature of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The Project REVEAL initiative generated more than 22,000 high-resolution images, available for use by anyone for any purpose without restriction or fees. Future efforts will involve removing restrictions for other materials believed to be in the public domain and making them available through the Ransom Center’s digital collections portal.


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