Posts Tagged 'fun'

Library of Congress Archive adds born-digital content

Information Superhighway: Welcome to the Internet / Enjoy the Ride (via http://www.web-wise-wizard.com/internet-dns-web/)The Library of Congress has added two new born-digital collections to their archives.

The Webcomics Web Archive focuses on comics created specifically for the web and supplements the Library’s extensive holdings in comic books, graphic novels and original comic art. It has award-winning comics as well as webcomics that are significant for their longevity, reputation or subject matter. Also included are works by artists and subjects not traditionally represented in mainstream comics, including women artists and characters, artists and characters of color, LGBTQ+ artists and characters, as well as subjects such as politics, health and autobiography.

The Web Cultures Web Archive is a representative sampling of websites documenting the creation and sharing of emergent cultural traditions on the web such as GIFs, memes and emoji. As part of the American Folklife Center, the archive documents traditional cultural forms and practices, and the proliferation of smart phones, tablets, and wireless Internet connections has positioned networked communication as a space where people increasingly develop and share folklore.

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Archival slides from the Metropolitan Museum find new life as art

Institutional Memory: 35mm Slides from the Met’s CollectionAfter they were digitized, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s massive library of 35-millimeter slides might have ended up as landfill.

Instead they are the materials for an exhibition, Institutional Memory: 35mm Slides from the Met’s Collection, at the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs’s reuse center, Material for the Arts (MFTA). Five artists have transformed the 2×2 in. squares into works of art, from sculptures to a multimedia installation.

via Hyperallergic; h/t Andrea Frank

Slow Art Day: Saturday, April 8, 2017

Slow Art Day 2017 (Photo by Greg Neville)Slow Art Day, a global event to stop and savor works of art, will take place on Saturday, April 8. This is how it works:

  1. Sign up at a participating museum or art gallery. Locally, you can join in at the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB) and the Hammer Museum, UCLA.
  2. Attend and look at works of art slowly. Some museums pick 5 works, others may concentrate on 1 or 2 – while yet others will give more options. Show up at your venue, pay the admission fee (if there is one) and then look slowly – 5-10 minutes – at each piece of pre-assigned art or exhibition.
  3. Discuss your experience with venue hosts and other participants

Rijksstudio award finalists

For the last three years the Rijksmuseum has solicited design contributions inspired by the museum collection.  Members of the public can download images and submit their creations, which you can now vote on (until April 20).   Visit the Rijksstudio site to see the 10 wonderful finalists, and cast your vote.

A lovely marriage of Dutch painting and digital magic

This little video is quite a dreamy thing  – digital animations of several Rijksmuseum paintings.

A company named CS Digital Media  created these animations as large scale “digital posters” to recognize the anniversary of the Rijksmuseum renovation.  (They were on display in various Amsterdam metro stations, unfortunately only for a week.)

You can see more of their animated Rembrandts creations on YouTube

Art auction quiz

The New York Times has a quiz today, “Are You Smarter than a Billionaire?” which asks you to guess which item, in a pair from this week’s auction sales, got the highest price.   There are some surprises.  To help get you in the right frame of price reference: the Modigliani below fetched $170 million.

Modigliani

LA museums embracing digital innovations

Culture Monster highlights innovative examples of how various museums in Los Angeles are using digital technology:

  • Natural History Museum of Los Angeles: Interactive CT scans offer another way to access mummies
  • Autry National Center: In the exhibition space, first-person stories of characters features in the “Civil War” exhibit play as films from user-activated “daguerreotypes” (and, not mentioned in the article but on the website, playlists offer evocative music from the era)
  • GETTY-inspiredGetty Museum: Pushed for global open collection content and a #GettyInspired digital initiative to encourage interactivity with museum visitors
  • LACMA: Their new location-aware app is less straight didactic information and more conversational, so views spend more time with the art than their devices
  • The Huntington: Seven iPads are installed in strategic spots around the galleries to offer contextual information in the historic rooms
  • The Broad mobile appThe Broad: The new museum’s app has Bluetooth technology to be location-aware both outside and inside the museum, and will send a push notification with invitations and contextually aware information
  • MOCA: Eschewing “distracting” in-museum apps, the museum’s updated website seeks to engage viewers before and after visits

Check out a special Museums section in the New York Times for highlights on how New York museums use technology to engage visitors.


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