Posts Tagged 'education'

Help stop the elimination of the NEA and NEH

Even before his inauguration, the new President announced his intention to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). While named as part of an effort to cut the federal budget, these two organizations (and the The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which he would privatize) make up only 0.02% of annual federal spending.

Various arts organization have come out denouncing this act and have proposed important ways supporters can fight against cuts:

h/t Washington Post, ARTnews, Art Forum, artnet, Hyperallergic, Inside Higher Ed, etc. You get the point.

Even more reasons to study art history

Noah Charney, art historian and author, argues convincingly for the increased importance and relevance of a humanities-based education in “The art of learning: Why art history might be the most important subject you could study today” on Salon.com.  The multiple skills and interdisciplinary aspects of studying art history increase critical thinking, especially important in this age of fake news.  John Berger’s Ways of Seeing is more important than ever….Donald Trump; John Berger in 'Ways of Seeing' (Credit: Getty/Tom Pennington)

Art in context: installation photography on Artstor

From The Artstor Blog archive:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Special Exhibition Galleries, 2nd floor: "Gilbert Stuart" (October 21, 2004-January 16, 2005; image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art)If you read a review or article about an interesting museum exhibition you missed you can usually find images of the featured artworks. But have you ever wondered how the works were presented, where they were placed? Which pieces were shown together, and in what order?

Exhibition design is central in museology, also known as museum studies, which asks how to present exhibitions that engage and enlighten the viewer. It’s also of interest to curators, art historians, and even artists, who often want to see what effect context has on artworks. That’s why the Artstor Digital Library offers tens of thousands of exhibition documentation images ranging from the late 19th century to the present.

Met’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The New Edition

Fragment of a Queen's Face, New Kingdom, Amarna Period, yellow jasper (image: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Edward S. Harkness Gift, 1926, Acc. No. 26.7.1396)The Metropolitan Museum of Art has launched an updated Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The New Edition with a new navigation and interface, updated images, and restructured editorial content. The Timeline is still relational but now with a seamless browsing experience and easily accessible on any device, anywhere.

The Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History presents a chronological, geographical, and thematic exploration of global art history through The Met collection. It is a reference, research, and teaching tool conceived for students and scholars of art history. Authored by The Met’s experts, the Timeline comprises 300 chronologies, close to 1000 essays, and over 7000 works of art. It is regularly updated and enriched to provide new scholarship and insights on the collection.

h/t Jasmine Burns

Digital Public Library of America: A wealth of info, no card required

Digital Public Library of AmericaThe Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is an all-digital library that aggregates metadata — or information describing an item — and thumbnails for millions (over 11,000,000 and growing!) of photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more from libraries, archives, and museums around the United States. DPLA brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available. Search the Library, or use the Map or Timeline to focus your search by file format, contributors, date, language, location, or subject.

Want even broader search capability? Check out these apps Culture Collage (to return a DPLA search as an image stream) and, a Red Dot favorite, Search DPLA and Europeana (a side-by-side search of Europeana and the DPLA – that’s access to roughly 60 million items with one search!)

LA museums embracing digital innovations

Culture Monster highlights innovative examples of how various museums in Los Angeles are using digital technology:

  • Natural History Museum of Los Angeles: Interactive CT scans offer another way to access mummies
  • Autry National Center: In the exhibition space, first-person stories of characters features in the “Civil War” exhibit play as films from user-activated “daguerreotypes” (and, not mentioned in the article but on the website, playlists offer evocative music from the era)
  • GETTY-inspiredGetty Museum: Pushed for global open collection content and a #GettyInspired digital initiative to encourage interactivity with museum visitors
  • LACMA: Their new location-aware app is less straight didactic information and more conversational, so views spend more time with the art than their devices
  • The Huntington: Seven iPads are installed in strategic spots around the galleries to offer contextual information in the historic rooms
  • The Broad mobile appThe Broad: The new museum’s app has Bluetooth technology to be location-aware both outside and inside the museum, and will send a push notification with invitations and contextually aware information
  • MOCA: Eschewing “distracting” in-museum apps, the museum’s updated website seeks to engage viewers before and after visits

Check out a special Museums section in the New York Times for highlights on how New York museums use technology to engage visitors.

Open Access Week at Davidson Library

Open Access logoOpen Access Week is an annual international event that promotes open access as a new norm in research and scholarship. Please join us for any or all of the Library’s Open Access Week programs to learn about trends and challenges in scholarly publishing.

Programs held during the week include:

  • Reinventing Scholarly Publishing: UC Press. Monday, October 19, 4-5:15 pm (Room 1575, 1st Floor)
  • Reinventing Scientific Publishing: Collabra, JoVE, PLOS. Tuesday, October 20, 4-5:15 pm (Room 1575, 1st Floor)
  • Reinventing Impact Factors: Altmetrics. Wednesday, October 21, 4-5pm (Room 1575, 1st Floor)
  • Reinventing Publication Management at UC. Thursday, October 22, 4-6 pm (Room 1575, 1st Floor)
  • Innovation, Copyright, and the Academy: The Reinvention of Your Scholarship. Monday, November 2, 4-5:15 pm (Mary Cheadle Room, 3rd Floor)

Admission is free to all events. Refreshments will be served. The Library appreciates the support of our program co-sponsors: Academic Senate, Office of Research, and Graduate Division.


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