Posts Tagged 'education'

Five Cutting-Edge Innovations in Art History Tech

A demo of how the AR Mail postcards bring the Saint Sophia Cathedral of to life using augmented reality (image courtesy The Getty Iris)The Iris, the behind the scenes blog from The Getty, posted highlights from the recent SIGGRAPH Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques in Los Angeles that they found relevant to the future of museums.

They found, among the rigging demos and VR experiences, “real opportunities for advancements in programming and outreach for galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAMs).” Take a look at:

  • Open vs. Proprietary Data: Michelangelo’s David in VR
  • Arts Edutainment: Ghost Paint
  • Intuitive Architecture: AR Mail from Harbin
  • Tech-Mediated Human Interaction: Digital Playground
  • Diversity and Disruption: Latin America and Technology
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CAA Statement on May 23, 2017 Trump Proposed Budget

College Art Association“In early May, we recognized that your advocacy matters. Calls, letters, and visits from our members and arts and humanities supporters changed the fate of the NEA, the NEH, and the CPB for the remainder of the 2017 fiscal year. The federal agencies even got a little bump in funding.

“With the release of the more detailed White House FY2018 budget this morning, we now know that we at CAA, our members, and advocates for the arts and humanities must renew our efforts to fund these agencies through another fiscal year.

“The proposed budget put forth by the White House is nothing short of a gutting of federal support for the arts and humanities. The proposed budget asks for $29 million for the NEA, $30.45 million for the CPB, and $42 million for the NEH. These sums are intended as wind-down amounts resulting in the shuttering of the agencies in 2019. Yet, these are only three agencies among a long list facing cuts under the Trump FY2018 budget. Arts education through the Department of Education is zeroed out and the IMLS would see a 90-percent drop in funding, from $231 million to 23 million in FY2018. Social services agencies assisting the financially insecure are some of the hardest hit with cuts.

“Though these numbers are disheartening, we do know from our advocacy efforts on Capital Hill this year that the arts and humanities garner bipartisan support. Many of our elected officials understand the importance of these programs. They see the impact in their own districts through the work of non-profits, higher education institutions, and others who receive grants from the federal agencies.

“But the fight is far from over.

“Once again, it is imperative that all those who have been touched by the arts and humanities renew the fight to keep these agencies alive and thriving. We urge our members and supporters to make contact with your local representative and tell them the NEA, NEH, and CPB are an integral part of your lives and society.

“If you would like to hear what Holly Hughes, one of the NEA Four thinks about the rationale for defunding the NEA, click here.”

Use our toolkit to contact your local representative.

Read our March 16, 2017 Statement on the FY2018 skinny budget.

Read about Advocacy News from CAA.

Registration Open for CaVraCon 2017, June 12-13

CaVraCon 2017, June 12 + 13, UC BerkeleyRegistration is now open for the California Visual Resources Association Conference (CaVraCon). All CaVraCon events will be held June 12-13 at Wurster Hall at UC Berkeley. We welcome information professionals in archives, commercial enterprises, libraries, museums, and visual resources collections (academic, corporate, private) as well as students and interested members of the public to attend.

The program is now live on the CaVraCon conference website! The CaVraCon conference program features presentations and panel discussions on topics such as:

  • Digitization
  • Digital Preservation
  • Copyright
  • 3D/VR
  • Emerging Technologies
  • Digital Humanities
  • Digital Art History
  • Digital Exhibits
  • Digital Assets Management
  • Image Metadata

Please see the online registration form to register. Registration is $50 (or $25 for students and retirees).

Slow Art Day: Saturday, April 8, 2017

Slow Art Day 2017 (Photo by Greg Neville)Slow Art Day, a global event to stop and savor works of art, will take place on Saturday, April 8. This is how it works:

  1. Sign up at a participating museum or art gallery. Locally, you can join in at the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB) and the Hammer Museum, UCLA.
  2. Attend and look at works of art slowly. Some museums pick 5 works, others may concentrate on 1 or 2 – while yet others will give more options. Show up at your venue, pay the admission fee (if there is one) and then look slowly – 5-10 minutes – at each piece of pre-assigned art or exhibition.
  3. Discuss your experience with venue hosts and other participants

CAA Arts and Humanities Advocacy Toolkit

College Art Association

As we reported in January, the College Art Association released a statement condemning the proposed budget cuts to the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among other federal agencies. Now they’ve created an Advocacy Toolkit “to help our members and anyone who wants to advocate for the arts and humanities. Information is power, after all. The Tool Kit information is pulled from a variety of sources that aid in forging partnerships, obtaining accurate data on the impact of the arts and humanities, and actions one can take in order to use your voice effectively.

They also encourage you to contact CAA since CAA staff will attend both Arts Advocacy Day and Humanities Advocacy Day. The more stories we can share as we meet with colleagues and representatives, the more influence we collectively bring to the table.

h/t Mark Pompelia

Help stop the elimination of the NEA and NEH

Even before his inauguration, the new President announced his intention to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). While named as part of an effort to cut the federal budget, these two organizations (and the The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which he would privatize) make up only 0.02% of annual federal spending.

Various arts organization have come out denouncing this act and have proposed important ways supporters can fight against cuts:

h/t Washington Post, ARTnews, Art Forum, artnet, Hyperallergic, Inside Higher Ed, etc. You get the point.

Even more reasons to study art history

Noah Charney, art historian and author, argues convincingly for the increased importance and relevance of a humanities-based education in “The art of learning: Why art history might be the most important subject you could study today” on Salon.com.  The multiple skills and interdisciplinary aspects of studying art history increase critical thinking, especially important in this age of fake news.  John Berger’s Ways of Seeing is more important than ever….Donald Trump; John Berger in 'Ways of Seeing' (Credit: Getty/Tom Pennington)


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