Posts Tagged 'archives'

John Margolies Roadside America Photograph Archive

Wigwam Village Motel, Rialto, California, image date 1977 (John Margolies Roadside America photograph archive (1972-2008), Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division)

The Library of Congress has digitized over 11,000 slides by architectural critic and curator John Margolies (1940-2016). Photographed over a span of forty years (1969-2008), Margolies’ Roadside America work chronicled a period of American history defined by the automobile and the ease of travel it allowed. The Archive is one of the most comprehensive documentary studies of vernacular commercial structures along main streets, byways, and highways throughout the United States in the twentieth century.

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Library of Congress Archive adds born-digital content

Information Superhighway: Welcome to the Internet / Enjoy the Ride (via http://www.web-wise-wizard.com/internet-dns-web/)The Library of Congress has added two new born-digital collections to their archives.

The Webcomics Web Archive focuses on comics created specifically for the web and supplements the Library’s extensive holdings in comic books, graphic novels and original comic art. It has award-winning comics as well as webcomics that are significant for their longevity, reputation or subject matter. Also included are works by artists and subjects not traditionally represented in mainstream comics, including women artists and characters, artists and characters of color, LGBTQ+ artists and characters, as well as subjects such as politics, health and autobiography.

The Web Cultures Web Archive is a representative sampling of websites documenting the creation and sharing of emergent cultural traditions on the web such as GIFs, memes and emoji. As part of the American Folklife Center, the archive documents traditional cultural forms and practices, and the proliferation of smart phones, tablets, and wireless Internet connections has positioned networked communication as a space where people increasingly develop and share folklore.

Rodolfo Lanciani Digital Archive: Images of Rome

Giacomo Sangermano, engraving of a scaffolding for the restoration of the vault of St. Peter’s Basilica (1700) [In. nos. 16577_56 and Roma XI.54.57]Archaeologist, professor of topography, and secretary of the Archaeological Commission Rodolfo Lanciani (1845–1929) was a pioneer in the systematic, modern study of the city of Rome. His personal collection included his notes and manuscripts as well as a large collection of historic and contemporary images of the city.

The physical Lanciani Archive housed in Rome is usually open to scholars during limited hours only. But now, a new online Archive hosted by Stanford offers 24/7 access to almost 4,000 records with high quality images, generally organized in Lanciani’s preferred method of categorization, dividing material based on site, but users can also perform specific searches or filter results by medium, artist, date, topic, or publisher. A good place to start is the section of curated essays that explores focused topics such as Rome’s many domes and urban scenes of labor and production throughout time.

via Hyperallergic

Open-source platform maps artwork provenance

Screenshot of Mapping Paintings, showing the migration of Titian’s “Europa” (screenshot via mapping paintings.org)Launched by Boston University professor Jodi Cranston, Mapping Paintings is an open-source, searchable platform for compiling provenance data for individual artworks (not just paintings, despite its name), from owners to past locations to details of sales or transactions. It allows you to select artworks of interest and visualize their records across time and space, as plotted on a map.

It’s still in the early stages of development, but one particularly neat feature of Mapping Paintings is that it lets you filter through its database and overlay the paths of selected artworks on one map. So you can compare how different pieces by the same artist have traveled or where artworks currently owned by the same museum came from.

Besides contributing new individual entries to the database, users can also publish what the site deems a “project” — a custom-made map tracking the movement of any number of artworks whose images you upload and whose provenances you enter yourself. All projects are sent to an administrator for review; only those that are accepted as accurate will be added to the online library.

via Hyperallergic

Google launches art and fashion platform We Wear Culture

We Wear Culture: The stories behind what we wearGoogle has partnered with 180 institutions, schools and archives around the world for a new online project focusing on the history of fashion. We Wear Culture, which launched on the Google Arts & Culture website and mobile apps looks at “The stories behind what we wear.”

The project doesn’t just feature pretty pictures of beautiful fashion. We Wear Culture offers immersive 360° VR tours and exhibitions (Google Cardboard recommended) and explores themes like the long-standing collaboration between Art and Fashion, origin stories about iconic designs, trends and trendsetters, and a behind the scenes view of the Conservation Lab of the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Like many images in Google Arts & Culture, you can zoom in to see amazing details.

via The Art Newspaper

Guggenheim offers publications as e-books

Cover of Second enlarged catalogue of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Collection of Non-objective Paintings : on exhibition from February 8, 1937 through February 28, 1937, compiled by Hilla Rebay von Ehrenwiesen (New York: The Bradford Press, Inc., 1937)Over five years ago we celebrated the Guggenheim’s first exhibition catalogue e-book.

Currently, the museum has over 200 selected publications freely available on Internet Archive. The Archive offers many different view and download options for the books, which were published between 1937 – 2006. The project is part of the museum’s commitment as an educational institution to document its exhibitions and collections.

h/t Christian Brown

 

 

Getty Provenance Index® Databases adds art sales records

Left: The Entombment, Peter Paul Rubens, ca. 1612, oil on canvas. The J. Paul Getty Museum; Right: Inventory number on The Entombment (detail). Digital images courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.

The Getty Provenance Index® has added 138,000 database records of art sales from the 1600s and 1700s, including the earliest known catalog published in Britain. This brings the cumulative Databases holdings to more than 1.7 million records taken from source material such as archival inventories, auction catalogs, and dealer stock books. Quantity and scope of available research material varies by region, period, and type of document, and records are continually expanded and enriched on a regular basis. Visit Search the Getty Provenance Index® Databases for more information.


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