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CAA Arts and Humanities Advocacy Toolkit

College Art Association

As we reported in January, the College Art Association released a statement condemning the proposed budget cuts to the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among other federal agencies. Now they’ve created an Advocacy Toolkit “to help our members and anyone who wants to advocate for the arts and humanities. Information is power, after all. The Tool Kit information is pulled from a variety of sources that aid in forging partnerships, obtaining accurate data on the impact of the arts and humanities, and actions one can take in order to use your voice effectively.

They also encourage you to contact CAA since CAA staff will attend both Arts Advocacy Day and Humanities Advocacy Day. The more stories we can share as we meet with colleagues and representatives, the more influence we collectively bring to the table.

h/t Mark Pompelia

Getty’s first online exhibition preserves Palmyra

Two-part panorama featuring Colonnade Street, Louis Vignes, 1864. Albumen print. 8.8 x 11.4 in. (22.5 x 29 cm), each print. The Getty Research Institute, 2015.R.15 (digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program)

The Getty Research Institute‘s inaugural digital exhibition, The Legacy of Ancient Palmyra, was developed “as a tribute to Palmyra” with images by traveling artists and explorers who documented the site in former states of preservation. “Their works contribute to Palmyra’s legacy, one that goes far beyond the stones of its once great buildings.”

There are numerous additional resources to explore, including a Facebook Live behind-the-scenes perspective event with The Legacy of Ancient Palmyra co-curator Peter Louis Bonfitto and web designers Masato Nakada and Karen To Nakada as they discuss the challenges and insights that came with the creation of the GRI’s first online exhibition on Tuesday, March 14, from 9:00-9:15 am.

The Davis Museum’s statement on the immigration ban

In a comment on the current White House administration’s policies on immigration, the Davis Museum at Wellesley College has removed or covered all art in the galleries that was created by immigrants. The initiative is called Art-Less and is meant to illustrate the creative contributions made by immigrants to the US. Labels describing each piece will be left on display to underscore the impact. It runs Feb 16-21.  [Press release] davis-museum

Library of Congress digitizes rare books from the Rosenwald Collection

Giovanni Battista Braccelli, Bizzarie di varie figure / di Giouanbatista Braccelli, pittore fiorentin. [Livorno : s.n.], 1624. (courtesy Library of Congress. Lessing J. Rosenwald collection, 1345)The Rare Book and Special Collections Division of the Library of Congress has an active digitization program, sharing thousands of its treasures online for users all over the world. Their most recent announcement highlights digital additions to the Lessing J. Rosenwald Collection.

The Rosenwald Collection’s greatest strengths are in the fifteenth century woodcut books, early sixteenth-century illustrated books, William Blake, and twentieth-century livres des peintres. The late Mr. Rosenwald sought books produced by the earliest printers and outstanding presses of later periods, and books on the following subjects: science, calligraphy, botany, and chess. The catalog describing the collection published in 1978 contains 2,653 entries, many for books represented by more than one copy. The online list of items are organized by category and Rosenwald catalog number.

Click here to learn more about the Rosenwald Collection.

The Met implements an image Open Access policy

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, The Harvesters, 1565 (Acc. No. 19.164; courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art took to Facebook Live today to announce their new Open Access policy, which makes images of artworks it believes to be in the public domain widely and freely available for unrestricted use, and at no cost, in accordance with the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) designation and the Terms and Conditions of this website.

It also makes available data from the entire online collection ― both works it believes to be in the public domain and those under copyright or other restrictions ― including basic information such as title, artist, date, medium, and dimensions. This data is available to all in accordance with the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) designation.

Help stop the elimination of the NEA and NEH

Even before his inauguration, the new President announced his intention to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). While named as part of an effort to cut the federal budget, these two organizations (and the The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which he would privatize) make up only 0.02% of annual federal spending.

Various arts organization have come out denouncing this act and have proposed important ways supporters can fight against cuts:

h/t Washington Post, ARTnews, Art Forum, artnet, Hyperallergic, Inside Higher Ed, etc. You get the point.

Even more reasons to study art history

Noah Charney, art historian and author, argues convincingly for the increased importance and relevance of a humanities-based education in “The art of learning: Why art history might be the most important subject you could study today” on Salon.com.  The multiple skills and interdisciplinary aspects of studying art history increase critical thinking, especially important in this age of fake news.  John Berger’s Ways of Seeing is more important than ever….Donald Trump; John Berger in 'Ways of Seeing' (Credit: Getty/Tom Pennington)


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