Archive for the 'Pedagogy' Category

Five Cutting-Edge Innovations in Art History Tech

A demo of how the AR Mail postcards bring the Saint Sophia Cathedral of to life using augmented reality (image courtesy The Getty Iris)The Iris, the behind the scenes blog from The Getty, posted highlights from the recent SIGGRAPH Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques in Los Angeles that they found relevant to the future of museums.

They found, among the rigging demos and VR experiences, “real opportunities for advancements in programming and outreach for galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAMs).” Take a look at:

  • Open vs. Proprietary Data: Michelangelo’s David in VR
  • Arts Edutainment: Ghost Paint
  • Intuitive Architecture: AR Mail from Harbin
  • Tech-Mediated Human Interaction: Digital Playground
  • Diversity and Disruption: Latin America and Technology
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Rodolfo Lanciani Digital Archive: Images of Rome

Giacomo Sangermano, engraving of a scaffolding for the restoration of the vault of St. Peter’s Basilica (1700) [In. nos. 16577_56 and Roma XI.54.57]Archaeologist, professor of topography, and secretary of the Archaeological Commission Rodolfo Lanciani (1845–1929) was a pioneer in the systematic, modern study of the city of Rome. His personal collection included his notes and manuscripts as well as a large collection of historic and contemporary images of the city.

The physical Lanciani Archive housed in Rome is usually open to scholars during limited hours only. But now, a new online Archive hosted by Stanford offers 24/7 access to almost 4,000 records with high quality images, generally organized in Lanciani’s preferred method of categorization, dividing material based on site, but users can also perform specific searches or filter results by medium, artist, date, topic, or publisher. A good place to start is the section of curated essays that explores focused topics such as Rome’s many domes and urban scenes of labor and production throughout time.

via Hyperallergic

CAA Arts and Humanities Advocacy Toolkit

College Art Association

As we reported in January, the College Art Association released a statement condemning the proposed budget cuts to the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among other federal agencies. Now they’ve created an Advocacy Toolkit “to help our members and anyone who wants to advocate for the arts and humanities. Information is power, after all. The Tool Kit information is pulled from a variety of sources that aid in forging partnerships, obtaining accurate data on the impact of the arts and humanities, and actions one can take in order to use your voice effectively.

They also encourage you to contact CAA since CAA staff will attend both Arts Advocacy Day and Humanities Advocacy Day. The more stories we can share as we meet with colleagues and representatives, the more influence we collectively bring to the table.

h/t Mark Pompelia

Even more reasons to study art history

Noah Charney, art historian and author, argues convincingly for the increased importance and relevance of a humanities-based education in “The art of learning: Why art history might be the most important subject you could study today” on Salon.com.  The multiple skills and interdisciplinary aspects of studying art history increase critical thinking, especially important in this age of fake news.  John Berger’s Ways of Seeing is more important than ever….Donald Trump; John Berger in 'Ways of Seeing' (Credit: Getty/Tom Pennington)

Nine Architectural Photography Tutorials to Help You Get the Right Shot

Illustrations from "Complete self-instructing library of practical photography," vol. III, p. 56, ed. by J. B. Schriever (American School of Art and Photography (Scranton, PA: American School of Art and Photography, 1909). Courtesy New York Public LibraryCapturing the perfect architectural photograph can be far more difficult than one might anticipate.

In light of this, ArchDaily compiled a list of nine architectural photography tutorials to help you get the right shot every time.
Larnach Castle, Dunedin, New Zealand. Image by Stephen Murphy

Art in context: installation photography on Artstor

From The Artstor Blog archive:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Special Exhibition Galleries, 2nd floor: "Gilbert Stuart" (October 21, 2004-January 16, 2005; image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art)If you read a review or article about an interesting museum exhibition you missed you can usually find images of the featured artworks. But have you ever wondered how the works were presented, where they were placed? Which pieces were shown together, and in what order?

Exhibition design is central in museology, also known as museum studies, which asks how to present exhibitions that engage and enlighten the viewer. It’s also of interest to curators, art historians, and even artists, who often want to see what effect context has on artworks. That’s why the Artstor Digital Library offers tens of thousands of exhibition documentation images ranging from the late 19th century to the present.

Met’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The New Edition

Fragment of a Queen's Face, New Kingdom, Amarna Period, yellow jasper (image: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Edward S. Harkness Gift, 1926, Acc. No. 26.7.1396)The Metropolitan Museum of Art has launched an updated Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The New Edition with a new navigation and interface, updated images, and restructured editorial content. The Timeline is still relational but now with a seamless browsing experience and easily accessible on any device, anywhere.

The Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History presents a chronological, geographical, and thematic exploration of global art history through The Met collection. It is a reference, research, and teaching tool conceived for students and scholars of art history. Authored by The Met’s experts, the Timeline comprises 300 chronologies, close to 1000 essays, and over 7000 works of art. It is regularly updated and enriched to provide new scholarship and insights on the collection.

h/t Jasmine Burns


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