Archive for the 'Pedagogy' Category

Even more reasons to study art history

Noah Charney, art historian and author, argues convincingly for the increased importance and relevance of a humanities-based education in “The art of learning: Why art history might be the most important subject you could study today” on Salon.com.  The multiple skills and interdisciplinary aspects of studying art history increase critical thinking, especially important in this age of fake news.  John Berger’s Ways of Seeing is more important than ever….Donald Trump; John Berger in 'Ways of Seeing' (Credit: Getty/Tom Pennington)

Nine Architectural Photography Tutorials to Help You Get the Right Shot

Illustrations from "Complete self-instructing library of practical photography," vol. III, p. 56, ed. by J. B. Schriever (American School of Art and Photography (Scranton, PA: American School of Art and Photography, 1909). Courtesy New York Public LibraryCapturing the perfect architectural photograph can be far more difficult than one might anticipate.

In light of this, ArchDaily compiled a list of nine architectural photography tutorials to help you get the right shot every time.
Larnach Castle, Dunedin, New Zealand. Image by Stephen Murphy

Art in context: installation photography on Artstor

From The Artstor Blog archive:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Special Exhibition Galleries, 2nd floor: "Gilbert Stuart" (October 21, 2004-January 16, 2005; image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art)If you read a review or article about an interesting museum exhibition you missed you can usually find images of the featured artworks. But have you ever wondered how the works were presented, where they were placed? Which pieces were shown together, and in what order?

Exhibition design is central in museology, also known as museum studies, which asks how to present exhibitions that engage and enlighten the viewer. It’s also of interest to curators, art historians, and even artists, who often want to see what effect context has on artworks. That’s why the Artstor Digital Library offers tens of thousands of exhibition documentation images ranging from the late 19th century to the present.

Met’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The New Edition

Fragment of a Queen's Face, New Kingdom, Amarna Period, yellow jasper (image: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Edward S. Harkness Gift, 1926, Acc. No. 26.7.1396)The Metropolitan Museum of Art has launched an updated Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The New Edition with a new navigation and interface, updated images, and restructured editorial content. The Timeline is still relational but now with a seamless browsing experience and easily accessible on any device, anywhere.

The Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History presents a chronological, geographical, and thematic exploration of global art history through The Met collection. It is a reference, research, and teaching tool conceived for students and scholars of art history. Authored by The Met’s experts, the Timeline comprises 300 chronologies, close to 1000 essays, and over 7000 works of art. It is regularly updated and enriched to provide new scholarship and insights on the collection.

h/t Jasmine Burns

Happy 100th Birthday, Dada!

Hugo Ball in 'cubist costume' reciting his poem 'Elefantenkarawane' at the Cabaret Voltaire, 23 June 1916. Hugo Ball/Emmy Hennings Estate, Robert-Walser Archiv, Zürich (image courtesy DADA Companion)February 2016 marks a full century since the term “Dada” was first coined at Cabaret Voltaire, Zurich.

via A.V. Club; for resources on Dada, visit here and here

 

PS: It’s not a very festive birthday for the Cabaret Voltaire, however, as its future is uncertain

GRI releases Getty Scholars’ Workspace

scholarsworkspace_keynoteThe Getty Research Institute has released a wonderful open-source (and free) collaborative research tool called Getty Scholars’ Workspace.  It allows users to save and annotate images (from the Getty as well as other sources), construct text and bibliographies, and best of all to share saved content with others.   This has great potential for student assignments as teams can collaborative online.

Read more about the GSW’s capabilities, and how to install, here.

Livestream of Digital Art History symposium on Feb. 22

DukeThe Wired! Group at Duke University is hosting and livestreaming a symposium on Monday, Feb. 22, called “Apps, Maps & Models: Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology & Visual Studies”.  The focus is on the use of digital tools in art historical and archaeological research.

The sessions run 9am-1pm and 2-5pm (Note that all times are Eastern, so the morning session actually begins at 6am Pacific Time!).   The full schedule and list of speakers with links to the livestream is here.

 


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