Archive for the 'Museum news' Category

Open-source platform maps artwork provenance

Screenshot of Mapping Paintings, showing the migration of Titian’s “Europa” (screenshot via mapping paintings.org)Launched by Boston University professor Jodi Cranston, Mapping Paintings is an open-source, searchable platform for compiling provenance data for individual artworks (not just paintings, despite its name), from owners to past locations to details of sales or transactions. It allows you to select artworks of interest and visualize their records across time and space, as plotted on a map.

It’s still in the early stages of development, but one particularly neat feature of Mapping Paintings is that it lets you filter through its database and overlay the paths of selected artworks on one map. So you can compare how different pieces by the same artist have traveled or where artworks currently owned by the same museum came from.

Besides contributing new individual entries to the database, users can also publish what the site deems a “project” — a custom-made map tracking the movement of any number of artworks whose images you upload and whose provenances you enter yourself. All projects are sent to an administrator for review; only those that are accepted as accurate will be added to the online library.

via Hyperallergic

Google launches art and fashion platform We Wear Culture

We Wear Culture: The stories behind what we wearGoogle has partnered with 180 institutions, schools and archives around the world for a new online project focusing on the history of fashion. We Wear Culture, which launched on the Google Arts & Culture website and mobile apps looks at “The stories behind what we wear.”

The project doesn’t just feature pretty pictures of beautiful fashion. We Wear Culture offers immersive 360° VR tours and exhibitions (Google Cardboard recommended) and explores themes like the long-standing collaboration between Art and Fashion, origin stories about iconic designs, trends and trendsetters, and a behind the scenes view of the Conservation Lab of the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Like many images in Google Arts & Culture, you can zoom in to see amazing details.

via The Art Newspaper

Archival slides from the Metropolitan Museum find new life as art

Institutional Memory: 35mm Slides from the Met’s CollectionAfter they were digitized, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s massive library of 35-millimeter slides might have ended up as landfill.

Instead they are the materials for an exhibition, Institutional Memory: 35mm Slides from the Met’s Collection, at the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs’s reuse center, Material for the Arts (MFTA). Five artists have transformed the 2×2 in. squares into works of art, from sculptures to a multimedia installation.

via Hyperallergic; h/t Andrea Frank

Guggenheim offers publications as e-books

Cover of Second enlarged catalogue of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Collection of Non-objective Paintings : on exhibition from February 8, 1937 through February 28, 1937, compiled by Hilla Rebay von Ehrenwiesen (New York: The Bradford Press, Inc., 1937)Over five years ago we celebrated the Guggenheim’s first exhibition catalogue e-book.

Currently, the museum has over 200 selected publications freely available on Internet Archive. The Archive offers many different view and download options for the books, which were published between 1937 – 2006. The project is part of the museum’s commitment as an educational institution to document its exhibitions and collections.

h/t Christian Brown

 

 

An in-depth way to explore the Garden of Earthly Delights

It’s been available for awhile, but we recently discovered this amazing interactive tool and wanted to promote it.  The Prado Museum developed an “audio-visual journey” of Heironymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights, which can be explored through a variety of means.  You can watch the full documentary, take a tour, or explore on your own by clicking the note icons at various points in the painting.  It’s a stellar example of inventive and rich museum education.

Bard Graduate Center exhibition installation images now in Artstor

Thomas Hope: Regency Designer, Installation view; 2008. Image and original data contributed by Bard Graduate Center GalleryArtstor announced that the Bard Graduate Center has released 2,500 images of exhibitions installed in their Gallery. The Bard Graduate Center is an academic unit of Bard College that offers advanced degrees in decorative arts, design history, and material culture and the Gallery is an intimate environment for viewing loan exhibitions curated by the Center’s faculty, staff, students, or specialized curatorial consultants, frequently in collaboration with renowned institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Victoria and Albert Museum, and the New-York Historical Society.

Slow Art Day: Saturday, April 8, 2017

Slow Art Day 2017 (Photo by Greg Neville)Slow Art Day, a global event to stop and savor works of art, will take place on Saturday, April 8. This is how it works:

  1. Sign up at a participating museum or art gallery. Locally, you can join in at the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB) and the Hammer Museum, UCLA.
  2. Attend and look at works of art slowly. Some museums pick 5 works, others may concentrate on 1 or 2 – while yet others will give more options. Show up at your venue, pay the admission fee (if there is one) and then look slowly – 5-10 minutes – at each piece of pre-assigned art or exhibition.
  3. Discuss your experience with venue hosts and other participants

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