Archive for the 'Image tools' Category

Open-source platform maps artwork provenance

Screenshot of Mapping Paintings, showing the migration of Titian’s “Europa” (screenshot via mapping paintings.org)Launched by Boston University professor Jodi Cranston, Mapping Paintings is an open-source, searchable platform for compiling provenance data for individual artworks (not just paintings, despite its name), from owners to past locations to details of sales or transactions. It allows you to select artworks of interest and visualize their records across time and space, as plotted on a map.

It’s still in the early stages of development, but one particularly neat feature of Mapping Paintings is that it lets you filter through its database and overlay the paths of selected artworks on one map. So you can compare how different pieces by the same artist have traveled or where artworks currently owned by the same museum came from.

Besides contributing new individual entries to the database, users can also publish what the site deems a “project” — a custom-made map tracking the movement of any number of artworks whose images you upload and whose provenances you enter yourself. All projects are sent to an administrator for review; only those that are accepted as accurate will be added to the online library.

via Hyperallergic

Google launches art and fashion platform We Wear Culture

We Wear Culture: The stories behind what we wearGoogle has partnered with 180 institutions, schools and archives around the world for a new online project focusing on the history of fashion. We Wear Culture, which launched on the Google Arts & Culture website and mobile apps looks at “The stories behind what we wear.”

The project doesn’t just feature pretty pictures of beautiful fashion. We Wear Culture offers immersive 360° VR tours and exhibitions (Google Cardboard recommended) and explores themes like the long-standing collaboration between Art and Fashion, origin stories about iconic designs, trends and trendsetters, and a behind the scenes view of the Conservation Lab of the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Like many images in Google Arts & Culture, you can zoom in to see amazing details.

via The Art Newspaper

An in-depth way to explore the Garden of Earthly Delights

It’s been available for awhile, but we recently discovered this amazing interactive tool and wanted to promote it.  The Prado Museum developed an “audio-visual journey” of Heironymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights, which can be explored through a variety of means.  You can watch the full documentary, take a tour, or explore on your own by clicking the note icons at various points in the painting.  It’s a stellar example of inventive and rich museum education.

Pharos: The International Consortium of Photo Archives

Images from the Collections Jacque Doucet, Bibliothèque de l’INHA (Institut national d’histoire de l’art)

PHAROS is an international consortium of fourteen European and North American art historical photo archives committed to creating a digital platform, currently in beta, that allows research among the photographic holdings of all consortium members – an estimated 31 million images, including artworks and supplemental material.

One of the best searching features they’re working on is reverse-image searching – the ability to upload a digital image or URL where an image is located, and search the database as you would a text query to return results related to the image. This image-recognition technology strives to eradicate language barriers inherent in text searching.

via NYTimes; h/t Ann Jensen Adams

George Eastman House collections online

Unidentified maker, We just held the camera in front of us, dated July [19]32, gelatin silver print (Gift of Peter J. Cohen, acc. no. 2015.0123.0042; image courtesy of The George Eastman Museum)The George Eastman Museum’s vast collections are now searchable online, including over 250,000 objects from the photography, technology, and George Eastman Legacy collections. Visit often as additional records and images will be added on an ongoing basis, including the Moving Image collection of more than 28,000 titles spanning the entire history of world cinema.

via Open Culture, h/t Denise Massa

Nine Architectural Photography Tutorials to Help You Get the Right Shot

Illustrations from "Complete self-instructing library of practical photography," vol. III, p. 56, ed. by J. B. Schriever (American School of Art and Photography (Scranton, PA: American School of Art and Photography, 1909). Courtesy New York Public LibraryCapturing the perfect architectural photograph can be far more difficult than one might anticipate.

In light of this, ArchDaily compiled a list of nine architectural photography tutorials to help you get the right shot every time.
Larnach Castle, Dunedin, New Zealand. Image by Stephen Murphy

Artstor image download improvements

ArtstorArtstor just announced that with the latest system update users can now download individual images as JPGs – they are no longer zip files, which means you save a step.

The second bit of good news is that the embedded metadata function is now working, so that information travels with the downloaded image.   You can view the metadata in a number of ways, e.g. Photoshop (File Info), the Photo Viewers built into Windows or Apple operating systems, or Windows Explorer.

Read more on the Artstor blog.


Posts by Category

Posts by month

Visitors

  • 96,286

Copyright Notice

© The Red Dot, 2009. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to The Red Dot with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Pages

July 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31