Archive for the 'Art news' Category

New Artstor resource: 36,000 images from the Center for Creative Photography

Brett Weston, untitled, 1973, Gelatin silver print (Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona; Gift of Wynn Bullock; Accession Number: 76.3.3; Artstor Image ID: AWSS35953_35953_37981071)The Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona has contributed nearly 36,000 images to the Artstor Digital Library. The Center is recognized as one of the world’s finest academic art museums and study centers for the history of photography.

The Center opened in 1975 with the archives of five living master photographers — Ansel Adams, Wynn Bullock, Harry Callahan, Aaron Siskind, and Frederick Sommer — and has grown to include 239 archival collections. Among these are some of the most recognizable names in 20th-century North American photography: W. Eugene Smith, Lola Alvarez Bravo, Edward Weston, and Garry Winogrand.

This selection from the Center is an essential resource for Photography and a rich repository for Interdisciplinary Studies, supporting research in Environmental Studies, Geography, Social History, and Sustainability.

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Picturing Places from the British Museum

William Darton, A new pocket plan of London, Westminster and Southwark: with all the adjacent buildings. Also a correct lift of upwards of 300 hackney coach fares. (London, 1797) [Shelfmark: Maps Crace Port. 5.181]Picturing Places explores the role and history of topographical views, maps and texts through over 500 examples from the British Library’s collections and beyond, with fresh research in over 100 articles and films from an academic conference hosted by the British Library and Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

The site highlights a selection of important items from the Library’s vast and varied collections, including prints, drawings, paintings, books, maps, letters, notes and ephemera. Users can examine high-resolution digitized images and read articles by emerging and established scholars discussing the history, context and significance of these images.

Open-source platform maps artwork provenance

Screenshot of Mapping Paintings, showing the migration of Titian’s “Europa” (screenshot via mapping paintings.org)Launched by Boston University professor Jodi Cranston, Mapping Paintings is an open-source, searchable platform for compiling provenance data for individual artworks (not just paintings, despite its name), from owners to past locations to details of sales or transactions. It allows you to select artworks of interest and visualize their records across time and space, as plotted on a map.

It’s still in the early stages of development, but one particularly neat feature of Mapping Paintings is that it lets you filter through its database and overlay the paths of selected artworks on one map. So you can compare how different pieces by the same artist have traveled or where artworks currently owned by the same museum came from.

Besides contributing new individual entries to the database, users can also publish what the site deems a “project” — a custom-made map tracking the movement of any number of artworks whose images you upload and whose provenances you enter yourself. All projects are sent to an administrator for review; only those that are accepted as accurate will be added to the online library.

via Hyperallergic

CAA Statement on May 23, 2017 Trump Proposed Budget

College Art Association“In early May, we recognized that your advocacy matters. Calls, letters, and visits from our members and arts and humanities supporters changed the fate of the NEA, the NEH, and the CPB for the remainder of the 2017 fiscal year. The federal agencies even got a little bump in funding.

“With the release of the more detailed White House FY2018 budget this morning, we now know that we at CAA, our members, and advocates for the arts and humanities must renew our efforts to fund these agencies through another fiscal year.

“The proposed budget put forth by the White House is nothing short of a gutting of federal support for the arts and humanities. The proposed budget asks for $29 million for the NEA, $30.45 million for the CPB, and $42 million for the NEH. These sums are intended as wind-down amounts resulting in the shuttering of the agencies in 2019. Yet, these are only three agencies among a long list facing cuts under the Trump FY2018 budget. Arts education through the Department of Education is zeroed out and the IMLS would see a 90-percent drop in funding, from $231 million to 23 million in FY2018. Social services agencies assisting the financially insecure are some of the hardest hit with cuts.

“Though these numbers are disheartening, we do know from our advocacy efforts on Capital Hill this year that the arts and humanities garner bipartisan support. Many of our elected officials understand the importance of these programs. They see the impact in their own districts through the work of non-profits, higher education institutions, and others who receive grants from the federal agencies.

“But the fight is far from over.

“Once again, it is imperative that all those who have been touched by the arts and humanities renew the fight to keep these agencies alive and thriving. We urge our members and supporters to make contact with your local representative and tell them the NEA, NEH, and CPB are an integral part of your lives and society.

“If you would like to hear what Holly Hughes, one of the NEA Four thinks about the rationale for defunding the NEA, click here.”

Use our toolkit to contact your local representative.

Read our March 16, 2017 Statement on the FY2018 skinny budget.

Read about Advocacy News from CAA.

Rijksstudio award finalists

For the last three years the Rijksmuseum has solicited design contributions inspired by the museum collection.  Members of the public can download images and submit their creations, which you can now vote on (until April 20).   Visit the Rijksstudio site to see the 10 wonderful finalists, and cast your vote.

Getty Provenance Index® Databases adds art sales records

Left: The Entombment, Peter Paul Rubens, ca. 1612, oil on canvas. The J. Paul Getty Museum; Right: Inventory number on The Entombment (detail). Digital images courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.

The Getty Provenance Index® has added 138,000 database records of art sales from the 1600s and 1700s, including the earliest known catalog published in Britain. This brings the cumulative Databases holdings to more than 1.7 million records taken from source material such as archival inventories, auction catalogs, and dealer stock books. Quantity and scope of available research material varies by region, period, and type of document, and records are continually expanded and enriched on a regular basis. Visit Search the Getty Provenance Index® Databases for more information.

CAA Arts and Humanities Advocacy Toolkit

College Art Association

As we reported in January, the College Art Association released a statement condemning the proposed budget cuts to the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among other federal agencies. Now they’ve created an Advocacy Toolkit “to help our members and anyone who wants to advocate for the arts and humanities. Information is power, after all. The Tool Kit information is pulled from a variety of sources that aid in forging partnerships, obtaining accurate data on the impact of the arts and humanities, and actions one can take in order to use your voice effectively.

They also encourage you to contact CAA since CAA staff will attend both Arts Advocacy Day and Humanities Advocacy Day. The more stories we can share as we meet with colleagues and representatives, the more influence we collectively bring to the table.

h/t Mark Pompelia


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