Getty celebrating its first digital-born publication

Pietro Mellini, Inventory in Verse, 1681 (Getty Research Institute, #860066, fol. 8verso)The Getty Research Institute published its first digital-born research project, Pietro Mellini’s Inventory in Verse, 1681: A Digital Facsimile with Translation and Commentary, an unpublished seventeenth-century manuscript in the GRI’s Special Collections. Viewers can examine high-resolution manuscript images that are zoomable, side-by-side windows that compare facsimile, transcription, and English translation, as well as highlighted text in the transcription that provides scholar annotations. This research project was conceived as a model for digital “scholarly workspaces” of “how the use of technology can offer new opportunities for research, communication, and dissemination of primary source materials, and that it demonstrates the results of collaborative research.”

Advertisements

0 Responses to “Getty celebrating its first digital-born publication”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Posts by Category

Posts by month

Visitors

  • 95,660

Copyright Notice

© The Red Dot, 2009. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to The Red Dot with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Pages

April 2015
M T W T F S S
« Mar   May »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

%d bloggers like this: