Picturing Places from the British Museum

William Darton, A new pocket plan of London, Westminster and Southwark: with all the adjacent buildings. Also a correct lift of upwards of 300 hackney coach fares. (London, 1797) [Shelfmark: Maps Crace Port. 5.181]Picturing Places explores the role and history of topographical views, maps and texts through over 500 examples from the British Library’s collections and beyond, with fresh research in over 100 articles and films from an academic conference hosted by the British Library and Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

The site highlights a selection of important items from the Library’s vast and varied collections, including prints, drawings, paintings, books, maps, letters, notes and ephemera. Users can examine high-resolution digitized images and read articles by emerging and established scholars discussing the history, context and significance of these images.

Open-source platform maps artwork provenance

Screenshot of Mapping Paintings, showing the migration of Titian’s “Europa” (screenshot via mapping paintings.org)Launched by Boston University professor Jodi Cranston, Mapping Paintings is an open-source, searchable platform for compiling provenance data for individual artworks (not just paintings, despite its name), from owners to past locations to details of sales or transactions. It allows you to select artworks of interest and visualize their records across time and space, as plotted on a map.

It’s still in the early stages of development, but one particularly neat feature of Mapping Paintings is that it lets you filter through its database and overlay the paths of selected artworks on one map. So you can compare how different pieces by the same artist have traveled or where artworks currently owned by the same museum came from.

Besides contributing new individual entries to the database, users can also publish what the site deems a “project” — a custom-made map tracking the movement of any number of artworks whose images you upload and whose provenances you enter yourself. All projects are sent to an administrator for review; only those that are accepted as accurate will be added to the online library.

via Hyperallergic

Google launches art and fashion platform We Wear Culture

We Wear Culture: The stories behind what we wearGoogle has partnered with 180 institutions, schools and archives around the world for a new online project focusing on the history of fashion. We Wear Culture, which launched on the Google Arts & Culture website and mobile apps looks at “The stories behind what we wear.”

The project doesn’t just feature pretty pictures of beautiful fashion. We Wear Culture offers immersive 360° VR tours and exhibitions (Google Cardboard recommended) and explores themes like the long-standing collaboration between Art and Fashion, origin stories about iconic designs, trends and trendsetters, and a behind the scenes view of the Conservation Lab of the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Like many images in Google Arts & Culture, you can zoom in to see amazing details.

via The Art Newspaper

Archival slides from the Metropolitan Museum find new life as art

Institutional Memory: 35mm Slides from the Met’s CollectionAfter they were digitized, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s massive library of 35-millimeter slides might have ended up as landfill.

Instead they are the materials for an exhibition, Institutional Memory: 35mm Slides from the Met’s Collection, at the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs’s reuse center, Material for the Arts (MFTA). Five artists have transformed the 2×2 in. squares into works of art, from sculptures to a multimedia installation.

via Hyperallergic; h/t Andrea Frank

CAA Statement on May 23, 2017 Trump Proposed Budget

College Art Association“In early May, we recognized that your advocacy matters. Calls, letters, and visits from our members and arts and humanities supporters changed the fate of the NEA, the NEH, and the CPB for the remainder of the 2017 fiscal year. The federal agencies even got a little bump in funding.

“With the release of the more detailed White House FY2018 budget this morning, we now know that we at CAA, our members, and advocates for the arts and humanities must renew our efforts to fund these agencies through another fiscal year.

“The proposed budget put forth by the White House is nothing short of a gutting of federal support for the arts and humanities. The proposed budget asks for $29 million for the NEA, $30.45 million for the CPB, and $42 million for the NEH. These sums are intended as wind-down amounts resulting in the shuttering of the agencies in 2019. Yet, these are only three agencies among a long list facing cuts under the Trump FY2018 budget. Arts education through the Department of Education is zeroed out and the IMLS would see a 90-percent drop in funding, from $231 million to 23 million in FY2018. Social services agencies assisting the financially insecure are some of the hardest hit with cuts.

“Though these numbers are disheartening, we do know from our advocacy efforts on Capital Hill this year that the arts and humanities garner bipartisan support. Many of our elected officials understand the importance of these programs. They see the impact in their own districts through the work of non-profits, higher education institutions, and others who receive grants from the federal agencies.

“But the fight is far from over.

“Once again, it is imperative that all those who have been touched by the arts and humanities renew the fight to keep these agencies alive and thriving. We urge our members and supporters to make contact with your local representative and tell them the NEA, NEH, and CPB are an integral part of your lives and society.

“If you would like to hear what Holly Hughes, one of the NEA Four thinks about the rationale for defunding the NEA, click here.”

Use our toolkit to contact your local representative.

Read our March 16, 2017 Statement on the FY2018 skinny budget.

Read about Advocacy News from CAA.

Registration Open for CaVraCon 2017, June 12-13

CaVraCon 2017, June 12 + 13, UC BerkeleyRegistration is now open for the California Visual Resources Association Conference (CaVraCon). All CaVraCon events will be held June 12-13 at Wurster Hall at UC Berkeley. We welcome information professionals in archives, commercial enterprises, libraries, museums, and visual resources collections (academic, corporate, private) as well as students and interested members of the public to attend.

The program is now live on the CaVraCon conference website! The CaVraCon conference program features presentations and panel discussions on topics such as:

  • Digitization
  • Digital Preservation
  • Copyright
  • 3D/VR
  • Emerging Technologies
  • Digital Humanities
  • Digital Art History
  • Digital Exhibits
  • Digital Assets Management
  • Image Metadata

Please see the online registration form to register. Registration is $50 (or $25 for students and retirees).

35,000 additional Magnum Photos images now on Artstor

Moises Saman, Zacharia Gazmouth, a suspected Shabiha prisoner, his body covered in self-inflicted defaced pro-Assad tatoos, is a prisoner at a makeshift jail in the rebel-held town of Marae, Aleppo Province, Syria, July 24, 2012. (© Moises Saman / Magnum Photos)Magnum Photos has now shared more than 35,000 additional images into Artstor’s Digital Library, bringing the total to approximately 116,000* of the world’s most recognized photographs.

Among the highlights are black and white shots of daily life in Europe by Raymond Depardon; Middle Eastern tensions and traditions observed by Abbas; elegant staged portraits from Marilyn to Einstein by Philippe Halsman; Martine Franck’s images of both ordinary people and luminaries; a vibrant sequence in India by Alessandra Sanguinetti; and Thomas Hoepker’s striking painterly landscapes. The collection also documents present-day concerns with photographs from geopolitical hotspots like Fukushima, Donetsk, and Aleppo.

Read more…

*Image totals may vary from country to country, reflecting Artstor’s obligation to address variations in international copyright.


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